Video

Noble Corp. and GE Partner on World’s First Digital Rig

 

Noble Corporation, a leading offshore drilling contractor for the Oil and Gas industry, is partnering with GE on the world’s first digital drilling vessel as an innovative step forward to unlocking the potential of digital offshore marine operations. With the Digital Rig℠ solution, powered by Predix Platform, Noble is aiming to expand data-driven operations support, while gaining visibility into drilling inefficiencies. LEARN MORE ABOUT GE DIGITAL: https://www.ge.com/digital SUBSCRIBE TO THE GE DIGITAL CHANNEL: https://www.youtube.com/c/GEDigital?s… CONNECT WITH GE DIGITAL ONLINE: Visit GE Digital’s Website: https://www.ge.com/digital/ Follow GE Digital on Twitter: https://twitter.com/GE_Digital Find GE Digital on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/2681277

YouTube

New OSHA fact sheet addresses silica rule for general industry, maritime

Washington — OSHA has published a fact sheet intended to help employers comply with the agency’s standard on worker exposure to respirable crystalline silica (1910.1053) for general industry and maritime.

The fact sheet highlights steps employers are required to take to protect employees, including assessing workplace exposures, establishing written exposure control plans and providing worker training.

The final rule lowers the permissible exposure limit for respirable crystalline silica for all industries to 50 micrograms per cubic meter of air averaged during an 8-hour shift.

Crystalline silica is a known carcinogen found in sand, stone and artificial stone. Exposure to silica dust can trigger silicosis, a chronic disease that involves scarring of the lungs. OSHA estimates that 2.3 million workers are exposed to the dust, including 2 million in construction.

OSHA issued its final rule as separate standards – one for construction and one for general industry and maritime. Both standards went into effect in June 2016; however, general industry and maritime have until June 23 to comply, except in the following areas:

  • Medical surveillance must be available by June 23, 2020, to employees who will be exposed to levels at or above the action level of 25 micrograms per cubic meter of air averaged during an 8-hour shift for 30 or more days a year.

  • Hydraulic fracturing operations in the oil and gas industry must institute – by June 23, 2021 – dust controls to limit exposures to the new PEL.

Source credit Safety + Health Magazine

Helping gas companies reduce their greenhouse emissions – Q&A

Over the next decade, oil and gas companies have a huge challenge and major responsibility to significantly reduce their carbon footprint and address climate change.

Ernesto Santibanez Borda, a PhD researcher in the Earth Sciences & Engineering Department at Imperial College is looking to help these companies choose the best method for limiting emissions associated with using and transporting natural gas. We interviewed him about his work with Professor Anna Korre.

1. What problem you are trying to solve/address in your PhD?

We recognize that hydrocarbon companies are faced with an enormous task to figure out how to reduce their emissions dramatically in a cost-effective and efficient way while providing energy for increased world consumption. While predictions from the International Energy Agency (IEA) outline gas consumption growth as the fastest among all fossil fuels resulting in a possible gas-carbon demand parity by 2040, there are still significant emissions from natural gas.

My PhD research focuses on the natural gas supply chain including the stages of production, processing, and transport through pipelines or as Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG). It is about developing an intelligent approach to choosing which technologies could be adopted to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) in a cost efficient way.

The idea is to also consider market conditions and policy related uncertainties to help strategic decision-making.

2. That sounds like a big project. So, what steps are involved in your PhD?

My PhD can be divided into three main parts.

First, I will use the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) methodology to understand the full extent of greenhouse gas emissions in the natural gas supply chain. This involves assessing all environmental impacts associated with all the stages of the natural gas supply chain from extraction through to distribution.

I am using models developed by the MERG (Minerals, Energy and Environmental Engineering Research Group) at Imperial College but I will also develop new ways. These models differ from the majority available in the market as there is a greater degree of accuracy in the estimation, most of the emissions are calculated based on material balance principles (which means accounting for material entering and leaving a system), and engineering calculations.

The second part is establishing the costs associated with each technological path using the Life Cycle Costing (LCC) methodology. When companies try to estimate their emissions through LCA, they can often see ways to reduce their emissions by adopting specific technologies. But in order to be able to implement those changes it is important to cost all those options.

The final step is to determine the best combination of technologies and practices that minimise environmental impacts and costs in order to aid industry decision-making. We are doing this  through multi-objective optimisation which is a technique that models a problem mathematically and minimises or maximises mutually excluding objectives. In this case, we want to see how low the emissions can be, if we spend a specific amount of money.

3. Is your PhD part of a larger body of work at Imperial College? Who else are you working with?

Yes, I work within Department of Earth Science and Engineering in the MERG group underthe supervision of Professor Anna Korre and Dr. Zhenggang Nie.

The developed models are currently being tested in different case studies, some of them provided by the Oil and Gas Climate Initiative project in which we are involved in, and the results will be compared with the reported emissions/costs and benchmark values from literature to validate our results. We also want to analyse case studies from the Brazilian natural gas value chain.

I have also been working with the Sustainable Gas Institute, and using a lot of data from Dr Paul Balcombe’s paper (Methane & CO2 emissions from the natural gas supply chain).

4. Why are you concentrating on LNG?

Projections by IEA state that by 2040 inter-regional gas trade can expand by up to more than 40%, and LNG’s share of inter-regional gas trade can increase from 10 to 50%.

In addition, we believe that an optimisation assessment of the environmental impacts and costs of the LNG processes has still not been thoroughly addressed considering the impacts it has on other parts of the natural gas value chain.

5. What motivated you to work in energy research?

Energy is vital to the international economy, but there are still so many challenges; improving efficiency, and reducing our environmental impact as well as meeting increasing global demand.

I found the research around finding ways to meet global demand while making sure we keep to the environmental targets set by the latest international commitments quite fascinating. Seeing companies in the energy sector get involved also encouraged me to join this research area.

Finally, I like the work of integrating different knowledge disciplines such as hydrocarbon processing, operations research, and environmental assessment in order to produce a tool that could be used to make intelligent decisions that have a wide impact.

6. What attracted you or influenced you to becoming an engineer?

At secondary school, I realized I was interested in maths and science, so it was natural to start looking at careers that are related to those subjects, and engineering specifically caught my attention because it is practical and helps model, and find reasonable solutions for daily problems faced by individuals, companies or the society.

The fact that it does not just involve hard calculations, but can also integrate other disciplines into the decision-making also fascinated me because it opened a whole world of options on how to approach a specific problem.


Ernesto Santibanez Borda is a Brazilian and Chilean national. He holds a BSc Engineering from Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, and MSc Petroleum Engineering from Imperial College London.

He also has 2 years of experience as production planning engineer in Escondida mine, operated by BHP Billiton (Chile)

By Zara Qadir

The Sustainable Gas Institute

Emissions Monitoring Innovation – Clair

Satellite measurement is an ideal method for monitoring methane emissions from shale gas operations. Current methods require crews to visit each facility on a regular basis, whereas GHGSat’s high resolution satellites can identify superemitters through periodic surveys of all shale gas operations, without any on-site equipment, at a fraction of the cost of current methods.

As of 2019, GHGSat aircraft measurements will provide very-high resolution measurements of shale gas plays to complement GHGSat satellite measurements. Very high resolution measurements from GHGSat aircraft sensors will enable detection of smaller leaks, and localize those leaks within a facility to facilitate repair. GHGSat aircraft sensors will leverage the same post-processing toolchain used by its satellites, thereby cross-validating results and providing cost-effective aircraft services.

GHGSat’s “tiered solution” will combine satellite and aircraft measurements in a single service to detect approximately 90% of all methane leaks (by volume) from shale gas operations. This service is unique – no other company can combine both satellite and aircraft measurements in a single, cost-effective service for shale gas operators.

http://www.ghgsat.com/

 

Artificial Intelligence in Oil and Gas – Comparing the Applications of 5 Oil Giants

Today, AI is helping the oil and gas industry chart its future course. Since no previous sources have provided an in-depth look at the impact of AI among the leading oil and gas companies, we set out in this week’s research to help answer questions that oil and gas leaders are asking:

  • What types of AI are applications currently in use by leading oil and gas companies such as ExxonMobil and Shell?

  • What (if any) results have been reported on AI applications implemented by leading companies in the oil and gas industry?

  • Are there any common trends among their innovation efforts – and how could these trends affect the future of the oil and gas industry?

This article seeks to provide a comprehensive look at applications of AI by the five leading oil and gas companies. Our ranking of companies is based on the Forbes’ 2017 Global 2000 ranking of the world’s biggest public companies.

Through facts and figures we aim to provide pertinent insights for business leaders and professionals interested in how AI is impacting the petroleum industry.

Prior to exploring the applications, we’ll present the common patterns that emerged from our research in this industry.

Artificial Intelligence in Oil and Gas – Insights Up Front

The most popular AI applications from the top five industry leaders currently appear to be: 

  • Intelligent robots  – Robots designed with AI capabilities for hydrocarbon exploration and production, to improve productivity and cost-effectiveness while reducing worker risk (see ExxonMobil and Total below)

  • Virtual assistants – Online chat platform that helps customers navigate product databases and processes general inquiries using natural language (see Royal Dutch Shell below)

In the full article below, we’ll explore the AI applications of each company individually. We will begin with ExxonMobil, the #1 ranked company in this industry based on the Forbes’ 2017 Global 2000 ranking of the world’s biggest public companies.

ExxonMobil

Among its ongoing collaborative efforts with approximately 80 universities in the U.S. and abroad, In December 2016, ExxonMobil announced that it is working with MIT to design AI robots for ocean exploration. Brian Williams, an MIT professor and a designer of the AI software that helped create NASA’s Mars Curiosity Rover is a key member of the project team.

While the business advantage of using AI in deep-sea exploration may not be immediately apparent, the company aims to apply AI to boost its natural seep detection capabilities. Natural seeps occur when oil escapes from rock found in the ocean floor. An estimated 60 percent of oil underneath the earth’s surface in North America is due to natural seeps. Robots with the ability to navigate these oceanic regions and detect oil seeps can contribute to protecting the ecosystem and serve as indicators for robust energy resources. It is unclear specifically when ExxonMobil’s ocean exploring AI robots are expected to be deployed.

Oil Seeps

A visual depiction of natural oil seeps (source)

As a founding member of MIT’s Energy Initiative, ExxonMobil has committed a reported $25 million over 5 years to support energy research conducted by MIT faculty and staff. While the company has not published the total amount invested across its 80 university collaborations, we can gain some insight from the following published figures:

  • Princeton University: $5 million over 5 years

  • The University of Texas at Austin: $15 million

“Our goal is to have these submersibles embody the reasoning of the scientists that program them. You want the explorer to do the science without the scientist there. They need to be able to analyze data, keep themselves out of harm’s way and determine novel solutions in novel situations that go beyond basic mission programming. They need to have some common sense and the ability to learn from their mistakes.” – Professor Brian Williams, MIT

Exxon MIT AI

ExxonMobil’s MIT robotics collaboration (source)

Through its partnership with the MIT Energy Initiative and related efforts, ExxonMobil has made energy efficiency and the exploration of new energy sources a core focus of its business priorities. According to its 2016 annual report, the company has reportedly invested roughly $7 billion since the year 2000 on R&D and “deploying emissions-reducing technologies.” The company does not itemize allocations for these technologies and specifics on AI were not published.

Royal Dutch Shell

In August 2015, Shell announced that it would be the first company in the lubricants sector to launch an AI assistant for customers (an anomaly in terms of applications of artificial intelligence in oil and gas). Normally, customers searching for lubricants and related products must navigate a large database in order to find the ideal product(s) they are searching for. Shell aims to use its avatars, Emma and Ethan, to help customers discover products using natural language.

The Shell Virtual Assistant functions through an online chat platform through the company’s website. Examples of information that the system can provide include where lubricants are available for purchase, a range of available pack sizes and general information regarding the technical properties of specific products.

To provide context, the company claims that its Shell Virtual Assistant:

  • Handles over 100,000 data sheets for 3,000 products

  • Provides information on 18,000 different pack sizes

  • Understands 16,500 physical characteristics of lubricants

  • Matches Shell products to 10,000 competitive products

The Shell Virtual Assistant is only currently available in the U.S. and U.K. but also complements four other Shell services including Shell LubeMatch which reportedly provides “over two million product recommendations for Shell customers” annually and is accessible across 138 countries in 21 languages.

Shell Virtual Assistant

An infographic representing the claims made about Shell Virtual Assistant – from Shell’s website

We were able to access the virtual assistant on the company’s website. In a note to users posted above the platform, Shell states that the virtual assistant is still in pilot mode and that efforts are ongoing to increase the knowledge of the virtual assistants and to monitor their effectiveness.

At tech emergency, we have become increasingly wary of “chatbot” and “virtual assistant” efforts that present an innovative story without a substantive business application. It is difficult to assess the genuine business value of the Shell Virtual Assistant at this time, but we tend to air on the side of caution, and we encourage our business readers to do the same (we have collected a series of chatbots that do appear to be driving business value today, and we highlight them in our “7 chatbot use cases” article).

It behooves any company to present an exciting and innovative front in the press – and chatbots seem to be a “low hanging fruit” for supposed AI applications. This is by no means a warning that we specifically state for Shell – all press-facing technology initiatives serve the purpose of molding perceptions about the company (the goes for every industry). We do our best to dig for the genuine business ROI of AI applications, and we advise our readers to approach applications and press releases with skepticism, bearing in mind the motives of the companies behind them (which do not have to be malicious to be misleading and falsely optimistic).

Similar to Shell LubeMatch, the company is also looking to expand the service to other countries and languages.

Shell’s R&D expenditures in 2016 totalled $1.014 billion. While specifics on AI were not reported, according to its Investor’s Handbook, R&D priorities are focused on “improving the efficiency of its products, processes, and operations”, and there is a concentration on developing technologies which support low-carbon energy.

Subsea 7 Shell Robot

Shell’s innovation in collaboration with Subsea 7 has created an Autonomous Inspection Vehicle
that claims to provide safer and better inspections – at a significant cost savings

In the future, the company reportedly seeks to integrate AI and automation into its facilities. Shell envisions that automated robots will be able to take over routine observational tasks and data gathering currently conducted by human employees. The company reportedly integrated a virtual assistant called Amelia  into its business model to more efficiently respond to inquiries from suppliers regarding invoicing.

Shell believes the future of AI in its industry will see a significant increase in unmanned and automated facilities.

China Petroleum and Chemical Corp. (Sinopec)

Sinopec has hinted at the role of AI in moving innovation forward in the oil and gas industry. The company boasts a long-term plan to roll out construction of 10 intelligent plants with a goal of a 20 percent reduction in operation costs.

On the manufacturing front, Huawei (Chinese telecom company) in April 2017 announced a collaborative effort involving Sinopec to design what is described as a “smart manufacturing platform.”

The platform description highlights AI as one of 8 core capabilities of the platform which aims to deliver a centralized method of data management and support integration of data across multiple applications used to manage factory operations.

AI would serve to establish rules and models that would inform how data is interpreted and offer opportunities for identifying valuable insights to improve factory operations. Huawei did not specify a timeline for when Sinopec is expected to fully implement the platform.

Total

Hydrocarbon exploration, the ability to map and identify oil and natural gas deposits beneath the earth’s surface, is a growing area of focus in the oil and gas industry. However, more innovative and environmentally-friendly methods of achieving improved effectiveness and efficiency are needed in the field. Environmental conditions are increasingly challenging for workers conducting hydrocarbon exploration thus technology capable of handling the task while retaining optimal functionality is highly desirable.

In an effort to establish what is described as the “first autonomous surface robots able to operate on oil & gas sites,” Total launched an international competition in December 2013. Total’s ARGOS challenge (Autonomous Robot for Gas & Oil Sites) was narrowed down to five teams hailing from Europe, Asia and South America who were provided with a maximum of three years to finalize their prototypes. For each of the 5 teams, Total provided a maximum of €600,000 (approximately $707,376) to support research and design, and a single prize of €500, 000 (approximately $589,522.50) for the winning robot.

AI was a key component of how the robot would function. Total expected that competitors ensure that their robots were able to deliver reports encompassing real-time data collection related to inspection points (locations where exploration is taking place) and analyses around the effectiveness of the locations of interest.

Total established key goals for the ARGOS robot:

  • The ability to carry out inspections, during the day or night, which are currently performed by humans.

  • The ability to detect abnormal equipment activity and intervene in an emergency. Examples may include simple equipment malfunctions or more high-risk situations such as gas leaks.

In May 2017, Total selected ARGONAUTS designed by a team from Austria and Germany as its winner. Total retains exclusive intellectual rights to the technology behind the ARGONAUTS robot for a period of five years. No further announcements have been made as to when the company will begin implementing ARGONAUTS.

Within its Exploration and Production segment, Total reports that over half of R&D allocations are focused on improving exploration capabilities; hydrocarbons and robotics are specifically mentioned. Innovation and R&D expenditures for oil and gas activities totaled $689 million in 2016.

(Readers with a specific interest in robotics and vehicles for the heavy industry may want to listen to our heavy industry-focused interview with Dr. Sam Kherat on our AI in Industry podcast.)

Gazprom

In June 2017, Gazprom and Yandex (described as Russia’s leading internet company) entered into a cooperation agreement for the implementation of new projects in the oil and gas industry. The two companies plan to tap into AI and machine learning to roll out their prospective initiatives.

Specifically, the collaboration is expected to focus on:

  • Drilling and well completion

  • Modeling oil-refining strategies

  • Optimizing other technological processes

The cooperation agreement reportedly provides flexibility for independent exploration of technologies currently in use in the oil and gas industry and collaborative development and application of projects in R&D. Data sharing and technical support for employee training are also potential points of interest.

“Oil and gas are one of the most exciting industries currently since it involves massive volumes of data, and any easy solutions for optimizing production and business processes have long since been implemented. This combination, together with significant turnover and high level of technological development, creates good opportunities for securing a major effect from implementing solutions based on machine learning and artificial intelligence, and we look forward to a productive partnership, in the long term.” – Alexander Khaytin, COO, Yandex Data Factory

Time will tell specifically how Gazprom and Yandex will leverage AI and machine learning throughout their various initiatives as specific around implementation have not yet been reported.

Gazprom’s technology development plan appears to be deeply rooted in strategic partnerships. In fact, the company claims that it is taking an active approach to identifying innovative, collaborative opportunities that align with its strategic priorities.

Innovation has certainly been a feature of Gazprom’s media profile, however at this current time, our research provides inconclusive evidence of any AI applications that currently in progress or that have demonstrated some preliminary results.

Concluding Thoughts

Leaders in the oil and gas industry are integrating AI in multiple areas. Reducing the carbon footprint, deep sea exploration of hydrocarbons and the implementation of innovative, sustainable energy strategies are driving the pace of evolution in the field.

We suspect that the companies we researched for this article are also implementing lots of business intelligence AI applications – but that these technologies are less frequently mentioned in press (exciting robots and noble environmental efforts are better PR for oil giants than predictive analytics for fuel yields, for example). Nevertheless, we feel that the applications highlighted above should give business leaders a healthy overview of the current AI initiatives among the biggest players in the petroleum industry.

Global energy investment by sector took an interesting turn in 2016. For the first time,  the electricity sector pushed ahead of oil and gas sector. However, the oil and gas sector remains at two-fifths of the global energy supply investment.

AI robots are a promising area of interest particularly to help curb the risk of exposure to dangerous working conditions for many employees. While the U.S. has experienced a downward trend of labor-related injuries or fatalities in the field in recent years, efforts to improve employee working conditions are a smart investment. We predict that improvements in robotic dexterity in any field (retail, agriculture, manufacturing, etc) are likely to trickle directly to robots tasked with dangerous jobs such as those in oil and gas, and fire/rescue. We’ll be following the robotics field in the years ahead, and continuing to update our listings of innovative robotics vendors.

Among oil and gas companies (who are not generally seen to be AI innovators) we can expect industry leaders to be the early adopters. Big budgets and existing tech talent are necessary to implement robust AI initiatives (particularly for complex robotics programs), and few companies on earth have pockets as deep as the big oil giants. We suspect that relatively smaller oil and gas companies will mostly be following the AI leadership of the giants to currently rule the petrol realm.

Published  by Kumba Sennaar

Credit source: Tech Emergence 

New technologies will fuel surging US oil production

Commentary by David Farr, Chairman and CEO of Emerson

A funny thing happened to the oil and gas industry as it lay flat on the mat after the collapse of oil prices about four years ago.

It figured out how to get up and start investing for the future again.

While scores of exploration and production companies went bankruptand more than 200,000 American energy industry workers lost their jobs, some resourceful producers figured out how to slash costs and boost efficiency. Upstream, midstream and downstream, they adopted new technologies that enabled them to cope with much lower-priced oil.

Now, with oil back to $60 a barrel and more, their production is surging, and the world has in some ways been turned upside down. As The New York Times recently reported, the United States is rapidly becoming a significant world oil and gas producer. Led by shale oil companies that adopted innovative technologies, America will likely surpass Saudi Arabia and rival Russia as the world’s leading oil producer this year.

Good news just beginning to flow

But for oil and gas companies, it’s fair to say, the good news has really just begun to flow. That’s because the opportunities for applying technologies that bring down costs and boost productivity are still enormous, and innovation is expanding rapidly. The turnaround we have begun to see in some companies’ fortunes is only the tip of the iceberg.

In part that’s because until just recently, the industry has been decidedly slow to adopt new digital technologies. That’s understandable, given the hefty profit margins companies reaped when oil surpassed $100 a barrel – peaking a decade ago this summer at more than $145.

Prices like that made new approaches and innovation a low priority; the overwhelmingly primary challenge was production – maximizing output now. Then, when prices crashed – to $26 just two years ago – most companies were more focused on cutting their capital spending than innovation. The same pattern seemed to hold true across all manufacturing industries in general.

But as prices began to creep up again, at least some oil and gas companies began to fold more automation and technology into their plans. A year ago, I wrote that for the first time in years, I was beginning to see hope in the industry, as companies were finally beginning to make long-overdue investments to enhance safety, efficiency and productivity. Now these companies are playing a major role in the U.S. production surge.

For that very reason, more and more companies are going to want to jump on the bandwagon with them, accelerating the trend’s momentum. Also playing a role in companies’ plans: digital technology itself is better than ever before, and more reliable and safer.

Chewing on ‘Big Data’

Consider sensors, for example. Today they can measure not only variables such as temperature, pressure and fluid levels, but also more sophisticated ones, like corrosion, vibration and hazardous leaks. And they can wirelessly communicate all these measurements reliably, saving vast sums on engineering, no-longer-necessary wiring and labor. They can communicate over the Industrial Internet of Things (IoT), which is no longer a dream – it’s a reality. But this innovation is just beginning.

Then consider the ability to access the reams of information – the Big Data – that all these tireless sensors are producing. Cloud computing makes it possible to set up central operations wherever we want, even as the sensors operate in “four D” environments – places that are Dull, Distant, Dirty and Dangerous. New software and analytics are enabling companies to chew the Big Data into digestible bites and give them actionable insights. As a result, companies can predict, save and optimize in ways that would have been considered impossible only a few years ago.

An example: End-to-end Exploration and Production (E&P) solutions are now available to help oil and gas operators increase efficiency, reduce costs and improve return on investment. These solutions range from seismic processing and interpretation to production modeling.

Companies can now interpret data and generate high-fidelity representations of existing brownfield assets in ways that enable them to maximize production and avoid nonproductive drilling and wasteful exploration spending.

Advances like this will help companies ensure ongoing safety, improve reliability, maximize availability and reduce operating costs, as well as avoid negative environmental impacts. They’re the kinds of innovations that have already changed the world in just the last couple of years. It’s clear now that in the years ahead, we can confidently look forward to much more in a safer, more productive, more environmentally friendly environment.

Reference source: CNBC Published March 5, 2018

Video

Next Gen Oil Clean Up Technology

Few man made disasters are more destructive than oil spills or fuel leakages. Unfortunately, there has so far not been any reliable solution to mitigate or remedy these costly mistakes. But that can finally change with S’One Environment, our large-scale application of the revolutionary SIAAB-1 hydrocarbon neutralization biotech. Used to prevent fire and explosions in airplanes and road vehicles, the technology turns hydrocarbon-based fuels into an inert, solid-state sand like compound – in fractions of a second. S’One Environment uses this property to neutralize fuel spills in seashores, rivers, lakes or oceans, with staggering speed and efficiency: 500 liters (132 gallons) of S’One liquid can neutralize up to 50,000 liters of fuel, in about four hours and over an area of 11 km radius of water. The system is built for high portability and durability, which makes it easy to install and operate on offshore drilling platforms, oil tankers, petroleum trains, or even gas stations. The S’One stores 500 liters of SIAAB-1 liquid and provides fast delivery via a high capacity compressor and a turbine. It requires little to no maintenance, and it is fully reusable throughout the many years of its lifetime.

http://siaab-abe.com/product/siaab-1-…

contact@siaab-abe.com

YouTube

ExxonMobile Joins The Recycling Partnership With $1.5 Million Commitment

Global energy leader supports sustainability through proven recycling solutions

FALLS CHURCH, VA (April 9, 2018) – Global leader ExxonMobil is the first energy company to join The Recycling Partnership, a rapidly growing national nonprofit that leverages corporate investment to transform recycling for good in hundreds of communities across the country. Through support and collaboration, ExxonMobil, along with 34 other companies including Coca-Cola, Target, Amazon, Pepsi, Starbucks and P&G, is helping The Recycling Partnership create a sustainable future through recycling.

“We’re pleased to welcome ExxonMobil to The Partnership,” says Keefe Harrison, CEO of The Recycling Partnership. “Their $1.5 million investment in our organization shows a dedicated commitment to help us deliver measurable and sustainable change to peoples’ everyday lives through improved recycling system solutions. As our first energy industry partner, ExxonMobil recognizes that collaboration, across and within industries, is a key to building sustainable communities.”

In just four short years, The Recycling Partnership has reached 33 million households in 640 communities, which is almost a quarter of the U.S. population through its efforts to improve recycling access and increase the quality of recyclables. Since 2014, the nonprofit has leveraged $29 million in infrastructure diverting a total of 115 million pounds of recyclables from landfills, avoiding 164,000 metric tons of greenhouse gas and saving 2.0 trillion BTUs.

“At ExxonMobil, we believe our fundamental purpose is to help improve peoples’ lives and empower human progress,” says Dave Andrew, vice president of sustainability at ExxonMobil. “We are committed to providing sustainable solutions that make modern life possible so future generations can thrive. Expanding community access to efficient recycling systems is a priority for us, and we are very excited to be a part of the great work The Recycling Partnership is doing in this area.”

The Recycling Partnership’s goal is to help every family in America recycle and recycle well, so that the country can double its current recycling rate and capture 22 million more tons of recyclables per year, avoid 50 million metric tons of greenhouse gas annually, and save $250 million in contamination costs every year.

“Thanks to our partnership with global companies like ExxonMobil, which recognize the value of supporting our sustainability mission, we will be able to move closer to making the circular economy mainstream,” says Harrison. “We will also be able to have a much larger impact on the health of our planet and peoples’ everyday lives now and in the future.”

About The Recycling Partnership
The Recycling Partnership (www.recyclingpartnership.org) is a national nonprofit organization that leverages corporate partner funding to transform recycling for good in cities and towns all across America. As the only organization in the country that engages the full recycling supply chain from the corporations that manufacture products and packaging to local governments charged with recycling to industry end markets, haulers, material recovery facilities, and converters; The Recycling Partnership positively impacts recycling at every step in the process. By the end of 2018, The Recycling Partnership expects to have served 750 communities with tools, resources and technical support, provided 500,000 recycling carts, reached 40 million households, and helped companies and cities invest more than $33 million in recycling infrastructure.

Media Contact:
Stacy Wilbur
stacy@teak media.com
(617) 269-7171

Video

Intel Falcon 8+ Drone transforms inspections conducted in the oil and gas industry

Inspections in the oil & gas industry can be a costly, dangerous job. Learn how the #Intel Falcon 8+ is reducing injury risk and creating cost savings. Subscribe now to Intel Business on YouTube: http://intel.ly/intelitcenteryt About Intel Business: Get all the IT info you need, right here. From data center to devices, the Intel® Business Center has the resources, guidance, and expert insights you need to get your IT projects done right. Connect with Intel Business: Visit Intel Business’s WEBSITE: http://intel.ly/itcenter Follow Intel Business on TWITTER: https://twitter.com/IntelITCenter Follow Intel Business on LINKEDIN: https://www.linkedin.com/company/it-c… Follow Intel Business on FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/IntelBusiness Intel Falcon 8+ Drone transforms inspections conducted in the oil and gas industry | Intel Business https://www.youtube.com/intelitcenter

Youtube Published on Nov 16, 2017

Most Popular Topics

Editor Picks