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Inspiring engineers of the future

Shell is a passionate supporter of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. The skills of scientists, engineers, educators and leaders are essential to meeting the world’s demand for energy, whilst reducing carbon emissions. Our vision is to help equip future generations of problem-solvers, leaders and innovators to tackle the energy challenges that face us all. #makethefuture To find out more about STEM and the education programmes Shell support globally please visit http://www.shell.com/education Transcript: http://www.shell.com/content/dam/roya…

Together we can #makethefuture Visit our Website: http://www.shell.com/ Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Shell/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shell/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/shell Look us up on Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/royaldut…

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PRESS RELEASE: Oildex Announces OpenTicket

Oildex, the leader in financial automation solutions for the oil & gas industry, today announced OpenTicket, the next generation of the company’s digital field ticket solution. OpenTicket is the industry’s only comprehensive, end-to-end cloud-based platform that provides both operators and service providers with all the software they need to generate, review and approve digital field tickets. New capabilities of OpenTicket include a dedicated mobile application that supports both online and offline generation of digital field tickets, support for Drilling & Completions (D&C) and Lease Operating Expense (LOE) organizations, and processing optimizations that speed payments, improving operator/supplier relationships.

“Highly inefficient paper field tickets are the last obstacle to overcome when it comes to automating and digitizing the oilfield,” said Craig Charlton, CEO of Oildex. “OpenTicket solves this problem and allows service providers to quickly and easily submit field tickets while allowing operators to quickly and easily approve those field tickets. Coupled with our OpenInvoice platform and recently announced Supply Chain Finance program, we are creating the most efficient source-to-settle ecosystem in the oil & gas industry.”

New Capabilities in OpenTicket

  • Complete solution for both operators and service providers: Through online portals for both operators and suppliers, OpenInvoice integration, a cloud-based collaborative workflow engine, integration APIs and a dedicated mobile application, OpenTicket is a complete solution for both service providers generating and submitting field tickets, as well as operators adjudicating and approving field tickets.

  • Offline mobile support for service providers: A native iOS and Android mobile app allows for the creation of digital field tickets as work is completed with Store and Forward functionality, so it works even when service providers are offline. The application features a user interface designed with the needs of service providers working in the field in mind.

  • Support for Drilling & Completions (D&C): New OpenTicket D&C functionality including rentals support, as well as integration with industry-leading morning reporting systems to provide accurate up-to-the-minute cost information from field tickets submitted via the mobile app.

  • “Virtual Company Man” capability: For Lease Operating Expense (LOE) production operations field supervisors, OpenTicket provides a ‘virtual company man’ capability whereby service provider personnel become members of a virtual team, allowing the field supervisor to be aware of all operations and costs across a broad geographic territory in near real time.

  • Optimized processing expedites approval enables ‘Pay on Ticket’: Several new processing improvements such as automated price book reconciliation allow OpenTicket to significantly decrease the time associated with the approval, invoicing, and payments, leading to improved operator/service provider relationships.

“With the introduction of OpenTicket, Oildex seems to have figured out a solution to a problem that has plagued the oilfield services industry since the very beginning,” said Bob Cohen, Research Director, Ardent Partners. “Oildex has streamlined the field ticket process by offering reconciliation with price books and purchase/work orders, added support for auto-approval scenarios that automatically ‘flip the ticket’ into an invoice, and applied AP workflow and approval capabilities to the field ticket automation process.”

By removing the use of traditional paper field tickets, OpenTicket improves safety by eliminating unnecessary travel, makes all field ticket information analyzable data to support analytics initiatives, gives field supervisors complete visibility into all activities and costs, and automates compliance and reconciliation processing to expedite approvals and payments. OpenTicket fully integrates with OpenInvoice to create a seamless and automated platform for submitting field tickets and creating digital invoices for review and approval.

Packaging and Availability
Formerly known as OpenInvoice Field Ticket, OpenTicket is available now. Operators can subscribe to OpenTicket and purchase OpenTicket Mobile seats they can distribute to their service providers. Existing Field Ticket subscribers will be able to obtain OpenTicket Mobile licenses from Oildex. As an agile development shop, Oildex updates OpenTicket every month. While most of the new capabilities in OpenTicket are already available, some including D&C functionality is planned to be available this summer.

About Oildex
Oildex is transforming the way the oil and gas industry connects, collaborates and automates. More than 1,100 operators, 67,000 service providers, dozens of financial institutions and millions of mineral rights owners use the Oildex Network to seamlessly and securely collaborate with their business partners, automate critical business processes, eliminate the high cost and errors associated with the handling of paper, and obtain access to key data to make more informed business decisions. Oildex is headquartered in Denver and has offices in Calgary; Houston; Austin; Fayetteville, Arkansas, and Tennessee. Learn more about Oildex at http://www.oildex.com.

Contact:
Andy Prince
Public Relations
(512) 289-4728
[email protected]

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Geoscience BC – GHGMap project

 

Full project details are available on the Geoscience BC website: http://www.geosciencebc.com/s/2016-06… GHGMap uses novel sensors, developed by NASA/JPL , on drones to improve the speed, accuracy, safety and cost of measuring greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The technology will be used to remotely map emissions of gases such as methane, ethane and carbon dioxide — providing the independent measurement data needed for informed decisions. Developing and using new technologies to better understand GHG emissions helps Canada to maintain its reputation as a leader in clean resource development, in GHG emission reduction and in innovation. By bringing technology closer to commercialization, GHGMap will also create new economic opportunities for Western Canada. GHGMap meets a need to accurately and cost-effectively measure emissions of methane, ethane and carbon dioxide from sites that may be high sources of GHGs. These include natural and manmade sites such as, wetlands, landfills, sewage treatment plants, agricultural feedlots, gas wells, infrastructure and pipelines, dams and thawing permafrost. – Accurate measurement is essential to reliably assess true GHG emissions, not just modelled values. – As legislation evolves to work towards emissions reduction targets, governments need measurement-based GHG budgets to develop robust GHG inventories and quantify and verify reductions. – The petroleum energy sector and others want GHGMap to identify and reduce emissions. – Communities are demanding comprehensive, accurate and economical ways to obtain GHG emissions data, as they seek to make balanced resource development and the environmental decisions. Initially running from 2017 to 2020, GHGMap will: – Provide the first Canadian GHG inventory based on real-time, remote data collection, rather than the emissions models currently used for reporting. – Deploy laser spectrometer (OPLS) technology from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to measure GHG emissions. – Rapidly obtain and report measurements of trace quantities of greenhouse gas emissions on a regional scale or within just a few metres of GHG emitting site. – Identify and test greenhouse gas emissions at a variety of petroleum energy sites in Western Canada to improve identification and remediation. – Train highly qualified personnel to use equipment to survey GHG emissions. – Demonstrate real-time GHG emission monitoring and attract future commercial investment in and use of the technology by demonstrating a sustainable business model. The technology will be tested at selected gas sites in northeast British Columbia before being rolled out to other parts of Western Canada. Project Benefits GHGMap uses a laser spectrometer (OPLS) originally designed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory that measures critical GHGs, including methane, ethane and carbon dioxide at parts-per-billion levels. This tiny, 400 g OPLS instrument is mounted and flown on a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (sUAV or drone) to map GHG concentrations and distributions. The GHGMap team, which includes Geoscience BC, Geochemical Analytic Services, InDro Robotics and NASA/JPL, is also partnering with Optical Knowledge Systems to build the next generation system, a Capillary Absorption Spectrometer (CAS), which will add the powerfully diagnostic gas fingerprinting of carbon isotope to the measurement palette. This will use ‘atmospheric dispersion’ and ‘eddy covariance flux’ modelling to pinpoint locations and intensities of specific emissions. An important feature is the integration of large-scale methane and carbon dioxide measurements using Canada’s new GHGSat satellite. GHGMap bridges the scale and data gaps between satellite data and on-site pointsource measurements.

Geoscience BC

Published on Feb 22, 2018

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The SDGs and Business

What role can business play in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) The World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) launched the CEO Guide to the SDGs – a new resource aimed at galvanising engagement from global business leaders in relation to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The CEO Guide to the SDGs sets out clear actions that CEOs can take to begin to align their organisations with the SDGs and plot a course towards unlocking the value they represent. Find out more: http://www.wbcsd.org/Overview/Resourc…

Published by Green TV April 3, 2017

 

Robo-Glove – Wearable technology that reduces the force needed to operate tools

Researchers at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in collaboration with General Motors (GM) have designed and developed Robo-Glove, a wearable human grasp assist device, to help reduce the grasping force needed by an individual to operate tools for an extended time or when performing tasks having repetitive motion. Robo-Glove has the potential to help workers, such as construction workers, hazardous material workers, or assembly line operators, whose job requires continuous grasping and ungrasping motion. The Robo-Glove also has potential applications in prosthetic devices, rehabilitation aids, and people with impaired or limited arm and hand muscle strength. This NASA Technology is available for your company to license and develop into a commercial product. NASA does not manufacture products for commercial sale.

Benefits

  • Wearable assist technology: a lightweight robotic glove that fits on your hand

  • Small and compact design

  • Human-safe robotics: pressure sensors give a sense of touch or haptic feedback

  • Self-contained glove: actuators, pressure sensors, and synthetic tendons are embedded

  • Ergonomic – the system helps reduce muscle strain from repetitive motion tasks

Applications

  • Construction

  • Hazardous material handling

  • Medical

  • Automotive Repair

  • Manufacturing

  • Repetitive motion work

  • Oil and gas exploration

The Technology

This technology is directed to the field of wearable robotics, where a machine's strength and a human's ability to see, feel, and think are combined to develop a more robust system than if each operates separately.
This technology is directed to the field of wearable robotics, where a machine’s strength and a human’s ability to see, feel, and think are combined to develop a more robust system than if each operates separately.

Originally developed by NASA and GM, the Robo-Glove technology was a spinoff of the Robonaut 2 (R2), the first humanoid robot in space. This wearable device allows the user to tightly grip tools and other items for longer periods of time without experiencing muscle discomfort or strain. An astronaut working in a pressurized suit outside the space station or an assembly operator in a factory might need to use 15 to 20 lbs of force to hold a tool during an operation. Use of the Robo-Glove, however, would potentially reduce the applied force to only 5 to 10 lbs.

The Robo-Glove is a self-contained unit, essentially a robot on your hand, with actuators embedded into the glove that provide grasping support to human fingers. The pressure sensors, similar to the sensors that give R2 its sense of touch, are incorporated into the fingertips of the glove to detect when the user is grasping an object. When the user grasps the object, the synthetic tendons automatically retract, pulling the fingers into a gripping position and holding them there until the sensor is released by releasing the object. The current prototype weighs around two pounds, including control electronics and a small display for programming and diagnostics. A lithium-ion battery, such as one for power tools, is used to power the system and is worn separately on the belt.

Johnson Space Center
2101 NASA Parkway
Houston, TX 77058

281.483.3809
[email protected]

OFFSHORE DECOMMISSIONING IN ASIA PACIFIC REGION: WHY ‘RIG TO REEF’ IS VITAL

The Asia Pacific region is set to follow the North Sea in increasing its decommissioning activity over the next decade. Indonesia, Brunei, Malaysia and the rest of the region is home to 833 installations that are on or over 20 years old – the average life expectancy of offshore assets. But with so much of the region’s infrastructure under threat from decommissioning, many have questioned the impact to the environment.

A thought piece by the National University of Singapore (NUS) singled out the importance of rig to reef in this context back in 2012. In this blog, we explore what could be done in the region to both keep the integrity of the sea bed and complete decommissioning applications as efficiently as possible.

RIG-TO-REEF

Rig-to-reef (RTR) is the practice of converting decommissioned platform infrastructure into artificial reefs for the seabed. The practice has already proved popular in the Asia Pacific when the storm-damaged Baram-8 in Malaysia was made into an artificial reef. Despite there being no current RTRs in place in the region, there is sure to be an appetite as decommissioning work increases.

Rigs prove popular with sea life, especially as they become an integral part of the seabed over their 20-30 year life span. An OCS report that focussed on the Gulf of Mexico in 2000 stated that fish densities were 20-50 times higher around the platforms than anywhere else in open water – a true sign that artificial reefs work.

PROS OUTWEIGH THE CONS

While operators may look towards asset life extension techniques to keep relevant rigs operating, those who are set to decommission will be pleased to know that the pros outweigh the cons in terms of implementing RTRs with old assets.

Despite potential navigational issues around the Asia Pacific region, operators creating RTRs could benefit from being more environmentally friendly, increasing fisheries in the field, and potentially negating costs such as rig disposal. The question on whether RTRs would be welcome in the region are so far undecided and confusing by governing bodies, according to the NUS.

GIVEN THE GREEN LIGHT

In her presentation for the National University of Singapore, Youna Lyons highlighted the large discrepancy between governing bodies and law in the Asia Pacific region that meant operators looking to RTRs would be left confused as to whether they could undertake a project after decommissioning.

“(While) international law does not prevent the re-use of rigs as artificial reefs, provided that it does not compromise the safety of navigation, IMO guidelines (on the matter) are inadequate. A paradigm shift is needed in the approach.”

The biggest issue seems to be the safety of navigation around such artificial reefs by shipping traffic. That aside, the law states that rigs can be re-used, it is just a case of where they will be able to be positioned.

RIG TO REEF IS VITAL

In summary, the presentation reveals how vital rig to reefs can be for both operators and environment. While operators can potentially save money, and enhance the environment they’ve extracted from, the seabed and sea life can see drastic increases in activity if the manmade reefs are positioned well – as long as governing bodies and local authorities agree, Asia Pacific could benefit from more RTRs in the future.

THE INCREASE OF DECOMMISSIONING

As operators around the world review their aged assets, in the current climate it is no surprise to see decommissioning projects beginning on non-profitable rigs. In the Claxton Engineering Decommissioning Case Study Pack, you will learn how the Claxton team have already helped operators on their decommissioning projects and helped to save time and money too.

To find out more about the free offshore Decommissioning Case Study Pack, and to get your hands on a copy, click here.

Please be sure to follow and subscribe to Claxton at http://insights.claxtonengineering.com/.

Originally written and posted by Andy Norman, Head of Brand and Marketing, Claxton.

 

Siemens’ BlueVault™ energy storage solutions bring clean, reliable power to offshore operations

A clean, reliable power supply is critical for offshore oil and gas assets.

Siemens is now applying its extensive electrification experience in the marine industry to offshore oil and gas, with a focus on reducing emissions and risk in particularly unforgiving operational environments. The company’s advanced lithium-ion battery-based solution, known as BlueVault™, is suited for both all-electric and hybrid energy-storage applications. BlueVault energy storage solutions are designed to help ensure continuity of power and to minimize carbon dioxide emissions, with an end goal of a low-emissions platform. The battery is designed to maximize life, performance and safety.

Since 2013, Siemens has been supplying the marine industry with an innovative Diesel-Electric Propulsion (DEP) system, BlueDrive PlusC, designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, fuel consumption and maintenance costs when compared to traditional diesel-electric propulsion systems.

The company already has a track record of developing cost- and emission-reducing solutions for marine applications. In 2015, Siemens jointly developed the world’s first electric car ferry, Ampere, with Fjellstrand shipyard and ship-owner, Norled. Today, the Ampere ferry’s zero-emission propulsion solution has no direct or indirect emissions, because the batteries are recharged using hydro-electric power. The all-electric ferry weighs approximately half that of a regular car ferry due to the aluminum hull, and uses only 150 kWh of renewable energy per crossing which eliminates emissions and reduces fuel costs by 60 percent.

Pursuant to its research and development efforts and experience with harsh offshore operating environments, the company will open a fully robotized and digitalized plant in Norway that will develop and manufacture energy storage technologies for both marine and offshore oil and gas applications. The same battery storage solutions for marine and offshore environments are also applicable to offshore wind farms. In the longer term, Siemens hopes to leverage its expertise to develop a low-emissions offshore platform.

“Energy storage solutions provide a means to establish a stable, reliable electrical network by buffering intermittency and providing clean, dispatchable power,” said Terje Krogh, CEO of Siemens Offshore Solutions. “The Ampere ferry, which is entirely emission-free, serves as an example of how an energy storage system could also be successfully applied in an oil and gas environment.”

Siemens has already signed several contracts for its new energy storage system and expects to deliver the first one this summer.

This press release and press picture are available at www.siemens.com/press/PR2018050165PGEN

For further information on energy storage solutions, please see: https://www.energy.siemens.com/us/en/renewable-energy/distributed-and-hybrid-power/energy-storage-solutions.htm

Contact for journalists
Janet Ofano
Phone: +1 803-389-6753; E-mail: [email protected]

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Johan Sverdrup – the digital flagship

Digital technologies are shaping the world around us, and Statoil intends to be a driver of change in the energy industry. This film provides an overview of the digital ambitions and technologies which Statoil is working to implement on the Johan Sverdrup field to further improve safety, production and value.

Published on Feb 8, 2018

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