Continuous and unmanned aerial vehicle methane monitoring with a new digitally integrated platform – BHGE is unveiling LUMEN for oil and gas operators

  • At its 20th Annual Meeting in Florence, BHGE makes the commitment to reduce CO2 equivalent emissions 50 percent by 2030 and achieve net zero by 2050

  • BHGE will support customers’ efforts to reduce the carbon footprint of their operations by investing in its portfolio of lower carbon products and services

  • New and future technologies launched at the annual event include LUMEN, which is both a wireless ground-based and aerial drone-based methane detection system; as well as a turbine powered 100 percent by hydrogen

  • BHGE’s Gaffney, Cline and Associates has launched its own Carbon Management Practice, the first oil and gas consultancy to offer a quantitative assessment of the carbon intensity of oil and gas assets, evaluation of carbon solutions and the accreditation of emission reductions

FLORENCE, ITALY — 28 January 2019 – On the first day of its 20th Annual Meeting in Florence, Italy, Baker Hughes, a GE company (NYSE: BHGE), announced its commitment to reduce its CO2 equivalent (eq.) emissions 50 percent by 2030,* achieving net-zero CO2 eq. emissions by 2050.  The company also said it will invest in its portfolio of advanced technologies to assist customers with reducing their carbon footprint.

Net Zero Carbon Emissions

BHGE has already achieved a 26 percent reduction in its emissions since 2012 through a commitment to new technology and operational efficiencies.  BHGE will continue to employ a broad range of emissions reduction initiatives across manufacturing, supply chain, logistics, energy sourcing and generation.  BHGE has established a global additive manufacturing technology network with a mission to bring commercial-scale production closer to customers, reducing transportation impact and associated emissions.

“Oil and gas will continue to be an important part of the global energy mix, and BHGE is committed to investing in smarter technologies to advance the energy industry for the long-term,” said Lorenzo Simonelli, chairman and CEO of BHGE. “Managing carbon emissions is an important strategic focus for our business.   We believe we have an important role to play as an industry leader and partner.  BHGE has a long legacy of pushing the boundaries of technology and operating efficiency. Today we take this to the next level by committing to ambitious new goals for ourselves, and to provide lower carbon solutions expected by customers and society.”

New Carbon Management Practice

To further industry and customer efforts to reduce carbon emissions, BHGE’s Gaffney, Cline and Associates has launched a new Carbon Management Practice. This is the first oil and gas consultancy to offer a quantitative assessment of carbon intensity, evaluation of carbon solutions and the accreditation of emission reductions. This new practice helps governments, energy companies and the financial community understand and solve energy transition issues related to oil and gas resources, assets and investments.

Technology Partner to Customers

At its Annual Meeting, BHGE announced new and existing technologies that support operators’ efforts to reduce their carbon footprint:  

  • LUMEN, a full-suite of methane monitoring and inspection solutions capable of streaming live data from sensors to a cloud-based software dashboard for real-time results.  The platform consists of two seamlessly connected formats – a ground-based solar-powered wireless sensor network, and a drone-based system for over-air monitoring, – ensuring methane emissions rates and concentration levels are monitored and located as efficiently and accurately as possible. This builds on BHGE’s extensive portfolio of remote inspection and sensing technologies.

  • An agreement with H2U, Australia’s leading Hydrogen infrastructure developer, to configure BHGE’s NovaLT gas turbine generator technology to operate 100 percent on hydrogen for the Port Lincoln Project, a green hydrogen power plant facility in South Australia.

The new technologies build on BHGE’s expanding lower-carbon technology portfolio, which includes:

  • Modular Gas Processing: Modular gas processing at Nassiriya and Al Gharraf oilfields in Iraq will recover 200 million standard cubic feet per day of flare gas, reducing emissions by 5.7 million metric tons per year of CO2 equivalent, and monetizing the recovered gas. The recovered gas will be processed into dry gas, liquefied petroleum gas for cooking, and condensate, and will support domestic power generation as well as exports. An additional net 3.9 million metric tons of CO2 eq. emissions reductions are possible annually if incremental power generation is fueled by natural gas, displacing oil.  Flare gas recovery and use represent one of the largest emission reduction opportunities in the global oil & industry.

  • LM9000 Gas Turbine: BHGE’s most advanced aero-derivative gas turbine, introduced in 2017, was designed to allow the LNG train startup in the pressurized condition without venting process gas.  Its flexible fuel technology reduces emissions while eliminating water use in emissions abatement.  The LM9000 delivers 50 percent longer maintenance interval, 20 percent more power and 40 percent lower NOx emissions, resulting in 20 percent lower cost of ownership for LNG customers.

  • Integrated Compressor LineThis high-efficiency offshore compressor operates with zero emissions. It is driven by a high-speed electric motor in a single sealed casing and its rotor is levitated by active magnetic bearings (AMBs), allowing exceptional efficiency and reliability.

  • flare.iQ: flare.IQ™ provides highly accurate, near-continuous control of downstream flare performance by optimizing combustion efficiency, allowing operators to reduce flaring-related emissions by up to 12,100 metric tons of CO2 equivalent per flare annually. If deployed globally, flare.iQ could reduce annual emissions by 190 million metric tons of CO2 eq.

  • NextSource Modular CO2 Capture:  NextSource converts thermal energy from rich burn Waukesha engine exhaust to provide low-cost CO2 for oil and gas consumers. In the process, each four-engine pad reduces emissions by 16,200 metric tons of CO2 equivalent annually or 60 percent compared to the no-capture scenario. In addition, because CO2 is captured near the well site, emissions are avoided from not having to transport liquid CO2 from a remote location to the well site.

Visit https://annualmeeting.bhge.com to learn more about the Florence event including the conference agenda and speakers guide, and where the full proceedings from the Annual Meeting will be shared at the close of the event.

**BHGE’s 2030 emissions reduction targets and performance are based on scope 1 & 2 emissions for 2017 and baseline year 2012, as reported to the Carbon Disclosure Project..

Secrets of the Deep: The Stones Metocean Monitoring Project | Sustainability at Shell

Shell has opened up parts of its Stones Deepwater mooring line to universities and research institutions. The Stones Metocean Monitoring Project provides access to data – unreachable until now – helping to build scientific understanding of the Gulf of Mexico’s role in global climate and ocean circulation.

Transcript: https://s00.static-shell.com/content/…

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Published by Shell on Nov 29, 2017

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Study: Filtration a Viable Option for Produced Water from the Marcellus Shale

The rising production of natural gas from hydraulically fractured wells in Appalachia generates along with it contaminated produced water that must be carefully disposed of. Researchers at Pennsylvania State University say that producers would be wise to consider the environmental risks associated with the most commonly used disposal practice of underground injection, and instead adopt more environmentally friendly and sustainable innovations in water filtration.

The study, Sustainability in Marcellus Shale Development, published by Penn State’s College of Engineering in conjunction with Chevron, notes that produced and flowback water from the prolific Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania is most commonly disposed of through injection into saltwater injection wells drilled far below the deepest known aquifer.

But although this method is the cheapest available and most frequently used, it brings with it the potential for surface spills and casing leaks that can contaminate freshwater, as well as the risk of activating dormant faults and causing earthquakes.

Disposing Fracked Water

“During the hydraulic fracturing process, water and chemicals are used to stimulate the fissures in the rock in order to extract the natural gas. Water is mixed with sand and other chemicals and then injected into the well. After creating cracks in the Marcellus Shale, flowback water, a brine solution with heavy metals and chemicals, quickly comes back. Typically, this flowback water is stored in tanks or pits before treatment, recycling, or disposal,” according to the report, co-written by Kyle Bambu, Mike Spero, and Harry Polychronopoulos.

The most common way to dispose of this produced water is by pumping it into saltwater disposal wells that are drilled hundreds below the deepest known aquifers. But Pennsylvania’s unique geology is not well suited for such wells. At the time the study was published in Fall 2016, there were 144,000 Class II injection wells in the US and only eight of them were Class II salt water disposal wells in Pennsylvania. These eight wells combined accepted 8,667 barrels per day of brine, while similar wells operated in Texas can each dispose of more than 26,000 b/d of brine.

According to the report, the average cost to dispose of one bbl of fluid can range from as low as 25¢/bbl if the oil company operates its own disposal well, to anywhere from 50¢/bbl to $2.50/bbl if a commercial saltwater disposal well is used. The cost of using disposal is further increased by the cost of transportation.

“In northern Pennsylvania, where commercial disposal wells aren’t plentiful, the brine water may have to be transported to Ohio or West Virginia. This can increase costs by $4.00 to $6.00 a barrel, bringing the net cost of disposal in the Marcellus Shale region to $4.50/bbl to $8.50/bbl,” the study said.

The use of underground disposal wells is not without risk, and frequent concerns include the potential for groundwater contamination and induced seismic activity. In Youngstown, Ohio, the researchers noted that a Class II disposal well for fracking wastewater was linked to seismic activity after it activated a previously unknown fault line. That well was blamed for 10 minor earthquakes, the largest of which is a magnitude of 3.9. A spate of earthquakes in Oklahoma in recent years has likewise been linked to the increased injection of water into disposal wells.

The need to dispose of produced water in Pennsylvania has become more pressing in recent years as natural gas production from the prolific Marcellus and neighboring Utica shales has taken off.  Data from the federal Energy Information (EIA) Administration show that output from the shale formations more than tripled Appalachian gas production from 7.8 billion cubic feet per day in 2012 to 23.8 Bcf/d in 2017 (EIA). These plays are credited for driving growth in US natural gas production since 2012 and have played a critical role in enabling low domestic prices and increasing exports.

The Water Filtration Alternative

Researchers note that a number of alternatives to disposal wells are emerging at varying levels of cost. These largely involve treating the produced water to remove its various contaminants, which can include radioactive substances, heavy metals, and high concentrations of salt. Traditional wastewater treatment plants cannot be used because they lack the sufficient processes needed to clean this water.

The most cost competitive alternative to underground injection highlighted by researchers is the option of using a membrane to clean the brine produced water. The company Oasys Water offers a system that drives the brine solution through a series of semi-permeable membranes at a cost of nearly $2/bbl of water. The water that emerges from this process is clean enough to be discharged into streams or drainage systems.

Other potential treatments on the horizon that require further research include the option of boiling the water. However, researchers note that the cost of using this process can run upwards of $17/bbl and the heavy salt causes extreme wear and tear to the requisite industrial boilers, resulting in massive equipment replacement costs.

Lastly, the study says the process of electrodialysis could be used to separate water from contaminants. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have found that an electrical current can be used to separate fresh water from a salty solution. Salt is an effective conductor of electricity and successive stages of electrodialysis can remove most contaminates. But this process has not been tested in the oil and gas industry and there are not commercial treatment options available.

Researchers ultimately concluded that while the common practice of injecting produced water into disposal wells is relatively cheap, this practice comes with high environmental risks. These risks include the potential for groundwater contamination that is caused by surface spills or breaks in the tubing for saltwater disposal wells and even induced seismic activity.

At present, the impetus for improving produced water disposal practices is driven primarily by the sustainability practices of each producer and not government regulations. Researchers found that the oil and gas industry is exempt from some of the most stringent federal environmental regulations, like the Safe Drinking Water Act the Clean Water Act, but noted that states have been working to impose their own rules to address areas of concern. For instance, Pennsylvania in recent years adopted new guidelines intended to prevent spills and releases of harmful substances.

Today’s Best Option

The study ultimately recommends Oasys Water’s membrane filtration as the best option for disposing of produced water today. Researchers said that while using this method can result in slightly higher costs for water treatment and transportation, it appears to be the most sustainable solution until other technological advances are advanced in the future.

“This (membrane) system was recommended because of its relatively cheap cost yet adherence to sustainability and environmentally friendly concerns,” the study said.

To read a PDF of the Penn State study, click here.

Schlumberger’s Stewardship Tool

Schlumberger Global Stewardship

A long-standing culture of social and environmental stewardship worldwide

The Schlumberger Global Stewardship journey is continuing to gain momentum as the company works with customers, investors, NGOs and other relevant organizations to achieve its environmental, social, and governance (ESG) objectives.

The most recent Schlumberger Global Stewardship Report outlines the company’s approach to ESG that is rooted in a long-standing culture of social and environmental stewardship worldwide. As a business and a community of individuals, Schlumberger focuses on areas where its organizational strengths, technological expertise, and cultural values can have the greatest impact.

The report describes Schlumberger Global Stewardship initiatives such as:

Technological expertise

The company has developed software technology that incorporates sustainability into its engineering and operational practices by modeling efficiency gains at the wellsite that yield a lower environmental footprint. By modeling its environmental footprint relative to metrics such as emissions, air quality, water use, noise, and chemical exposure, the unique web-based software is used to evaluate potential projects related to well stimulation. This software, known as the Stewardship Tool, has played an important role in the development of many next-generation technologies, such as the BroadBand unconventional reservoir completion services and the Automated Stimulation Delivery Platform.

Sustainable development

In 2017, Schlumberger became the first associate member of IPECA, the global oil and gas industry association for environmental and social issues. Schlumberger participated in IPIECA’s development of Mapping the Oil and Gas Industry to the Sustainable Development Goals: an Atlas, a publication describing the implications of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for the oil and gas industry and how IPIECA members may provide support in achieving these goals.

Community outreach

Schlumberger has a long-standing commitment to science and engineering as well as health and safety. This forms the basis of the company’s community outreach initiatives which includes programs that support science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education as well as health, safety and environment (HSE) workshops for youth—both local and global—many of which are supported by employee volunteers.

To learn more about these and other best practices, download the latest edition of the Schlumberger Global Stewardship report here.

Published Date: 09/14/2018

Source: www.slb.com

 

Oil And Gas CEO: New Tech Creates Opportunity

Data from KPMG’s 2018 Oil and Gas CEO Outlook, released Oct. 10, reveals that globally, almost all oil and gas CEOs believe new technology creates opportunities. Eighty-five percent are piloting or have already implemented Artificial Intelligence (AI).

However, only 59 percent feel their organization is an active disruptor in their own sector, and 57 percent feel that the lead times to achieve significant progress on transformation can be overwhelming

“Technology is disrupting the status quo in the oil and gas industry. AI and robotic solutions can help us create models that will predict behavior or outcomes more accurately, like improving rig safety, dispatching crews faster, and identifying systems failures even before they arise. This level of predictability can have a profound impact on our industry, said Regina Mayor, Global Sector Head, Energy, and Natural Resources, KPMG.

When asked about the biggest long-term benefits of AI, 46 percent of CEOs indicate an acceleration of revenue growth, 39 percent indicate increased agility as an organization, and 39 percent point to improved risk management, all within a three-year time frame. Further, they indicate high levels of confidence in their organizations’ digital transformation programs, AI systems, and robotic process automation.

Further, 58 percent of O&G CEOs feel AI and robotics technologies will create more jobs than they eliminate. In fact, 93 percent of CEOs expect an increase in industry-wide headcount over the next three years.

As oil prices remain elevated, industry confidence is up and CEOs are setting their sights on growth opportunities, with 85 percent very confident or confident on industry growth, and 88 percent very confident or confident on company growth prospects.

As part of their growth strategies, 83 percent of O&G CEOs anticipate a moderate to a high appetite for M&A activity over the next three years, largely driven by the need to reduce costs through synergies/economies of scale; a speedy transformation of business models; increased market share and low-interest rates.

“The higher price of oil is playing a significant role in driving a more positive sentiment across the industry,” said Mayor. “Executives are really honing in on ways they can improve internal efficiencies through strategic M&A moves and the use of robotics, AI and other means of digitalization across the industry.”

Despite a rosy outlook, there are still concerns and threats to achieving growth. Among the biggest threats to, 23 percent of CEOs point to emerging/disruptive technology risk, 20 percent say environmental and climate change risks and 18 percent point to a return to territorialism are most concerning.

Publisher by: Laxman PaiWednesday, 10 October 2018 23:36

SOURCE: OFFSHORE ENGINEER

Subsurface Data in the Oil and Gas Industry

Probing beneath the Earth’s surface for exploration and hazard mitigation

Drilling for oil and gas is expensive. A single well generally costs $5-8 million onshore and $100-200 million or more in deep water.1 To maximize the chances of drilling a productive well, oil and gas companies collect and study large amounts of information about the Earth’s subsurface both before and during drilling. Data are collected at a variety of scales, from regional (tens to hundreds of miles) to microscopic (such as tiny grains and cracks in the rocks being drilled). This information, much of which will have been acquired in earlier exploration efforts and preserved in public or private repositories, helps companies to find and produce more oil and gas and avoid drilling unproductive wells, but can also help to identify potential hazards such as earthquake-prone zones or areas of potential land subsidence and sinkhole formation.

Mapping the Subsurface 1: Regional Data from Geophysics

In the 21st century, much is already known about the distribution of rocks on Earth. When looking for new resources, oil and gas producers will use existing maps and subsurface data to identify an area for more detailed exploration. A number of geophysical techniques are then used to obtain more information about what lies beneath the surface. These methods include measurements of variations in the Earth’s gravity and magnetic field, but the most common technique is seismic imaging.

Seismic images are like an ultrasound for the Earth and provide detailed regional information about the structure of the subsurface, including buried faults, folds, salt domes, and the size, shape, and orientation of rock layers. They are collected by using truck-mounted vibrators or dynamite (onshore), or air guns towed by ships (offshore), to generate sound waves; these waves travel into the Earth and are reflected by underground rock layers; instruments at the surface record these reflected waves; and the recorded waves are mathematically processed to produce 2-D or 3-D images of subsurface features. These images, which cover many square miles and have a resolution of tens to hundreds of feet, help to pinpoint the areas most likely to contain oil and/or gas.

A typical setup for offshore seismic imaging. Image Credit: U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management.2

Mapping the Subsurface 2: Local Data from Well Logs, Samples, and Cores

Drilling a small number of exploratory holes or using data from previously drilled wells (common in areas of existing oil and gas production) allows geologists to develop a much more complete map of the subsurface using well logs and cores:

  • well log is produced by lowering geophysical devices into a wellbore, before (and sometimes after) the steel well casing is inserted, to record the rock’s response to electrical currents and sound waves and measure the radioactive and electromagnetic properties of the rocks and their contained fluids.3 Well logs have been used for almost 100 years4 and are recorded in essentially all modern wells.

  • core is a cylindrical column of rock, commonly 3-4 inches in diameter, that is cut and extracted as a well is drilled. A core provides a small cross-section of the sequence of rocks being drilled through, providing more comprehensive information than the measurements made by tools inside the wellbore.5 Core analysis gives the most detailed information about the rock layers, faults and fractures, rock and fluid compositions, and how easily fluids (especially oil and gas) can flow through the rock and thus into the well.

By comparing the depth, thickness, and composition of subsurface rock formations in nearby wells, geoscientists can predict the location and productive potential of oil and gas deposits before drilling a new well. As a new well is being drilled, well logs and cores also help geoscientists and petroleum engineers to predict whether the rocks can produce enough oil or natural gas to justify the cost of preparing the well for production.7

A box containing 9 feet of 4-inch diameter core from the National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska, showing the fine-scale structure and composition of the rock layers being drilled. Image Source: U.S. Geological Survey.6

Data Preservation

Preservation of subsurface data is an ongoing challenge, both because there is so much of it and because a lot of older data predate computer storage. A modern seismic survey produces a few to thousands of terabytes of data;8 state and federal repositories collectively hold hundreds of miles of core;9 and millions of digital and paper records are housed at state geological surveys. For example, the Kansas Geological Society library maintains over 2.5 million digitized well logs and associated records for the state.10 Oil companies also retain huge stores of their own data. Preserving these data, which cost many millions of dollars to collect, allows them to be used in the future for a variety of purposes, some of which may not have been anticipated when the data were originally collected. For example, the shale formations that are now yielding large volumes of oil and natural gas in the United States were known but not considered for development for decades while conventional oil and gas resources were being extracted in many of the same areas. Archived well logs from these areas have helped many oil and gas producers to focus in on these shale resources now that the combination of hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling allow for their development.

Data for Hazard Mitigation

Oil and gas exploration is a major source of information about the subsurface that can be used to help identify geologic hazards:

  • Since 2013, the oil and gas industry has provided more than 2,500 square miles of seismic data to Louisiana universities to assist with research into the causes and effects of subsidence in coastal wetlands. For example, seismic and well data have been used to link faults to historic subsidence and wetland loss near Lake Boudreaux.11

  • To improve earthquake risk assessment and mitigation in metropolitan Los Angeles, scientists have used seismic and well data from the oil and gas industry to map out previously unidentified faults. This work was motivated by the 1994 Northridge earthquake, which occurred on an unknown fault that was not visible at the Earth’s surface.12

More Resources

U.S. Geological Survey – National Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation Program.

References

1 U.S. Energy Information Administration (2016). Trends in U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Upstream Costs.
2 Bureau of Ocean Energy Management – Record of Decision, Atlantic OCS Region Geological and Geophysical Activities.
3 Varhaug, M. (2016). Basic Well Log Interpretation. The Defining Series, Oilfield Review.
4 Schlumberger – 1920s: The First Well Log.
5 AAPGWiki – Overview of Routine Core Analysis.
6 Zihlman, F.N. et al. (2000). Selected Data from Fourteen Wildcat Wells in the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska. USGS Open-File Report 00-200. Core from the well “East Simpson 2”, Image no. 0462077.
7 Society of Petroleum Engineers PetroWiki – Petrophysics.
8 “Big Data Growth Continues in Seismic Surveys.” K. Boman, Rigzone, September 2, 2015.
9 U.S. Geological Survey Core Research Center – Frequently Asked Questions.
10 Kansas Geological Society & Library – Oil and Gas Well Data.
11 Akintomide, A.O. and Dawers, N.H. (2016). Structure of the Northern Margin of the Terrebonne Trough, Southeastern Louisiana: Implications for Salt Withdrawal and Miocene to Holocene Fault Activity. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, 48(7), Paper No. 244-2.
12 Shaw, J. and Shearer, P. (1999). An Elusive Blind-Thrust Fault Beneath Metropolitan Los Angeles. Science, 283, 1516-1518.

Date updated: 2018-06-01
Petroleum and the Environment, Part 23/24
Written by E. Allison and B. Mandler for AGI, 2018

How to achieve technology innovation in the oil and gas industry

Many industries have exploited the exciting opportunities to create new products and markets, but the oil and gas sector has lagged behind and has resulted in the oil and gas industry failing to exploit the potential of new technologies

The oil and gas industry is now at a pivotal point in its evolution and we are now on the cusp of a transformation. The rise of new technologies, coupled with the ongoing global push for a reduced environmental impact, is altering the industry. Organisations across the sector face growing pressure to streamline their operations in order to improve overall efficiency and unlock additional barrels of oil to maximize revenue.

Despite these new hurdles, the oil and gas sector has been generally very slow compared to other industries when it comes to leveraging the potential of new technologies to innovate and optimize the performance of its systems. While companies have tackled the lower oil price with positive actions to reduce environmental impact, lower operating costs and increase efficiency, these gains must now be made sustainable, Therefore, we must truly transform the way we work.

See also: How can drones power the offshore oil and gas operations?

In light of these challenges, it is now vital that players, both new and old, fully embrace the potential of new solutions to kickstart the sector’s technological revolution and achieve the higher level of stability it desperately needs. Research conducted by McKinsey & Company found that the effective use of digital technologies across the industry could lower capital expenditures by up to 20%, reduce operating costs in upstream by 3 to 5% and by about half that that in downstream, demonstrating the clear cost-savings opportunities and efficiency to be had.

Investment in today’s visionaries for tomorrow

With new technologies emerging every day, many with the same promise of reducing costs and optimizing a business’ performance, ways to achieve technological advancement across the industry are now in abundance and oil executives must consider how best to accelerate this innovation to ensure its continued success on a global scale.

At the core of most of today’s technological innovation is either a desire or need to solve a particular problem. This way of thinking is often demonstrated best by those with a different vision of the industry’s future, who are able to identify the areas needing improvement and develop new solutions accordingly. The current oil and gas sector is no exception, and we are now seeing a rapid increase in the number of emerging oil and gas startups looking to move the industry away from its traditional practices and towards a new and more efficient way of operating.

In an industry where innovation is now the key to sustainability, the ‘if it isn’t broke, don’t fix it’ approach to development will no longer suffice. Larger companies must refocus much of their investment on the smaller, more ambitious technology developers to ensure revolutionary solutions enter the oil and gas market faster and enable them to prepare their existing solutions for success within a new era of innovation.

See also: 3 industries saving billions with cognitive machine learning

Accelerating changes to how we work and embracing new technologies will, therefore, be at the heart of the industry’s transformation; improving productivity, increasing efficiency and creating well-paid jobs. That said, it still vital that companies continue to balance this level of innovation with their existing knowledge of best practice for oil and gas organizations, to ensure a consistent position within the industry of both today and tomorrow.

One particular concept we have seen emerge across the oil and gas industry within the last decade is the digital oilfield, which refers to the real-time automation of operations through a combination of business process management systems and complex information technology, to ensure the simple management and tracking of the data. This has presented oil and gas companies with one way to streamline systems and achieve technology innovation, however, a greater investment in startups could see many other opportunities come to fruition. This means we must have a technology vision for the industry and a future where remote operations and automation are the norm.

Embracing a collaborative approach

One of the biggest challenges for oil and gas companies when achieving this degree of innovation on an industry-wide scale is finding the best way to integrate ground-breaking, new technologies. Embracing a more collaborative amongst new entrants and existing players is essential for streamlining the oil and gas landscape, reducing costs and overcoming the current lack of widespread technological development across the sector.

Partnered with a clear strategy for implementing this innovation across their business model, a greater convergence between the old and new will ensure companies are taking the best solutions from across the industry, not only to achieve innovation but to also give them a greater competitive edge within an increasingly in-demand and saturated market. This will require the industry, technology providers, government, regulators all working in partnership to deliver the technology transformation.

See also: Embracing hybrid cloud services in traditional industries

This kind of approach can provide huge benefits for all involved. For startups looking to enter the space, it can help them to connect with major investors and bring their solutions to market quickly and successfully as a result of increased investment, facilities, and resources. For the larger companies looking to invest in technology-driven solutions, this can help to change their outlook on their existing infrastructure and help to fill any technology gaps with revolutionary companies and products.

Oil and gas technology has not yet been at the forefront of the global innovation agenda, yet with demand for these services increasing every day, it is becoming increasingly ranked as a priority for change in many countries worldwide. It is now time to fully kick-start the industry’s technological revolution and the key to achieving this lies within the hundreds of emerging solutions being created by developers striving for sustainability and efficiency.

 

Originally published on Information Age 

Sourced by David Millar, TechX director, the Oil & Gas Technology Centre

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