Schlumberger’s Stewardship Tool

Schlumberger Global Stewardship

A long-standing culture of social and environmental stewardship worldwide

The Schlumberger Global Stewardship journey is continuing to gain momentum as the company works with customers, investors, NGOs and other relevant organizations to achieve its environmental, social, and governance (ESG) objectives.

The most recent Schlumberger Global Stewardship Report outlines the company’s approach to ESG that is rooted in a long-standing culture of social and environmental stewardship worldwide. As a business and a community of individuals, Schlumberger focuses on areas where its organizational strengths, technological expertise, and cultural values can have the greatest impact.

The report describes Schlumberger Global Stewardship initiatives such as:

Technological expertise

The company has developed software technology that incorporates sustainability into its engineering and operational practices by modeling efficiency gains at the wellsite that yield a lower environmental footprint. By modeling its environmental footprint relative to metrics such as emissions, air quality, water use, noise, and chemical exposure, the unique web-based software is used to evaluate potential projects related to well stimulation. This software, known as the Stewardship Tool, has played an important role in the development of many next-generation technologies, such as the BroadBand unconventional reservoir completion services and the Automated Stimulation Delivery Platform.

Sustainable development

In 2017, Schlumberger became the first associate member of IPECA, the global oil and gas industry association for environmental and social issues. Schlumberger participated in IPIECA’s development of Mapping the Oil and Gas Industry to the Sustainable Development Goals: an Atlas, a publication describing the implications of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for the oil and gas industry and how IPIECA members may provide support in achieving these goals.

Community outreach

Schlumberger has a long-standing commitment to science and engineering as well as health and safety. This forms the basis of the company’s community outreach initiatives which includes programs that support science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education as well as health, safety and environment (HSE) workshops for youth—both local and global—many of which are supported by employee volunteers.

To learn more about these and other best practices, download the latest edition of the Schlumberger Global Stewardship report here.

Published Date: 09/14/2018

Source: www.slb.com

 

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Drill cuttings and oil waste plant installed directly at the oilfield

TDP-2 pyrolysis plant designed for drilling waste treatment was installed at oilfield of oil and gas company. The plant is capable to obtain the valuable products from oil sludge thus there is no need in waste depositing. More details: http://tdplant.com/ Музыка: No Copyright Free Music GENERIC MUSIC https://youtu.be/X-ZwX5lyyy4?list=PLI…

Published on Feb 7, 2017

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To make sustainability real, make it personal

Neil Hawkins and Joe Árvai

Marc-Grégor Campredon 

Dow employees applying real-time learnings from the Sustainability Academy to their team project, designed to support one of Dow’s 2025 Sustainability Goals.

From the perspective of business, engaging employees is critical to developing and advancing a company’s sustainability goals. The feeling is mutual from the perspective of current, not to mention future employees: A company’s sustainability goals are important to the process of attracting and retaining the top talent.

But meaningful engagement across the entire spectrum of a company’s operations can be challenging. Many employees are often unsure how their job roles connect with a company’s sustainability programs and strategies, and many companies find it challenging to integrate — and inspire — leadership on sustainability in the day-to-day activities in their workforce. The net result: Employees often end up being an underused and undermotivated resource in a company’s sustainability journey.

Dow recognized these challenges early on and began to address them with its company-wide commitment to 2015, and now, 2025 Sustainability Goals, which have sought to redefine the role that business plays in society. A primary objective of the goals is to mobilize the human element — employees, suppliers, customers and the communities in which they live and work — to improve the well-being of people the world over.

To take the 2025 goals to the next level within the company, Dow collaborated with the Erb Institute of the University of Michigan in 2017 to design and launch the Dow Sustainability Academy. The Dow-Erb partnership has proven to be incredibly successful, productive, fun and, yes, sustainable. Dow brought to the table its decades of experience on making business sustainability real, and Erb brought its 20-year track record of being at the leading edge of research and teaching at the intersection of business, society and the environment.

The result of this partnership is a business-sustainability leadership and development program that provides Dow employees with the tools and insights they need to bring sustainability into their daily work. As part of the academy, Dow employees — selected as part of a competitive, application-based process — spend a week in training at the Erb Institute.

During this time, they learn from and interact with some of the world’s leading experts on a wide range of topics, from making the business case for sustainability and the policy backdrop against which business sustainability unfolds, to hands-on tools for implementing the elusive triple bottom line. When the in-class sessions come to a close, academy participants work on real-world projects related to one of the Dow sustainability goals and are given six months to use what they learned in Ann Arbor to complete them.

Recently, we had the pleasure of watching project teams from the second group of academy members present their project solutions to Dow leaders, as well as to the next contingent of employees chosen to be part of the academy. Each team passed along their advice to their successors in the academy, and it struck us while we listed to them that their learnings apply to not only academy participants but to anyone seeking to collaborate, stretch and grow at their company and in their career.

Here’s some of what we heard:

Avoid solutions that are attractive only because they are obvious or easy. One team was asked to determine the theoretical limits of how much emissions can be reduced from each Dow site, plant, equipment and technology. The aim was to help Dow achieve its 2025 Operations Sustainability Goal of growing the company globally over the next decade without allowing the company’s greenhouse gas emissions to exceed its 2006 baseline.

Team members had to reach outside their area of expertise and talk with dozens of people across Dow sites to understand and catalog the possible opportunities. By asking questions and — importantly — challenging assumptions about what previously were thought to be the performance range of various technologies and equipment, the group was able to identify additional, significant opportunities for reducing emissions.

When you face challenges, remember that your vision and passion are your North Star. All the projects carried out by academy participants require engaging in complex systems and with multiple stakeholders. In this kind of environment, sustainability objectives aren’t easy to define, and decisions must be made in an information-rich environment characterized by high levels of uncertainty.

One team, tasked with reducing food waste at a Dow site as part of the company’s goal to advance a circular economy, admitted that it was easy to get lost in rabbit holes or mired in red tape. However, by being true to their vision of what was possible, and by being persistent — “no” was not an acceptable answer — they were able to find both a workable solution for composting at a Dow site and identify local groups receptive and able to receive the compost.

Make “change agent” part of your job description. There’s a saying at Erb: When it comes to sustainability in business, be prepared to invent the job you want and then go do it. In other words, don’t wait to be anointed; being a change agent is a title you can bestow upon yourself.

The same goes for participants in the academy. One group was tasked with identifying a single project that aligned neatly with Dow’s valuing nature goal; the requirements were that the project had to be good for business but even better for the natural environment. Rather than identifying just one project, members took it upon themselves to identify one project each, for a total of three. From creating sustainable prairie habitat at company headquarter and planting native grasses to reduce erosion at a Seadrift, Texas, site to waste reduction at a plant in Freeport, Texas, these projects were heralded for their ability to cut emissions, rehabilitate the environment and bring business value to Dow.

As we get set to embark upon our fourth Dow Sustainability Academy, we could not be more delighted by what we have seen from those who have graduated from it. By thinking critically and creatively about sustainability’s role on the job, employees not only found answers to drive Dow’s sustainable practices but established critical leadership skills.

They learned to apply ingenuity and entrepreneurial spirit to address sustainability challenges and to respond to sustainability opportunities.

They began to see those sustainability decisions are real opportunities for setting and then achieving objectives and that business sustainability really is a journey that will require vision, leadership and course corrections along the way.

And they found that no matter their job titles, they actively could incorporate tools for sustainability into their jobs — and into their lives outside of work — in order to be champions for lasting, positive change.

That’s a win for employees, for Dow and Erb, and — most importantly — for society

 

Source: GreenBiz

TED Talk on methane and the oil and gas industry

This TED Talk heralds a new era in fighting climate change, from space

Watch this video to learn about a bold, new initiative to combat global warming

EDF and partners are launching a rocket to put a new satellite in orbit that could change the course of global warming in our lifetimes.

MethaneSAT will gather data about a pollutant – methane – that’s warming the planet, and put that data in the hands of people who can easily fix the problem.

EDF President Fred Krupp unveiled the groundbreaking project at TED’s flagship event in Vancouver, British Columbia, as part of The Audacious Project, successor to the TED Prize.

Just the first step will have the same near-term climate benefit as shutting down one-third of the world’s coal-fired power plants.

Fred Krupp, EDF President

Fred Krupp, EDF President

Our goal is to cut methane emissions 45 percent by 2025, and the data gathered by this satellite will make that possible. Nothing else will have the same kind of near-term impact at such a low cost.

The power of information

To learn the magnitude of the problem with methane, we collected data with drones, planes, helicopters, even Google Street View cars. It turned out that emissions are up to five times higher than what the government is reporting.

So we didn’t wait for Washington. We published our research, shared it with everyone and saw them take action. Leading oil and gas companies replaced valves and tightened loose-fitting pipes. Colorado became the first state to limit methane pollution. California followed suit, and the public joined in.

By bringing the right people to the table – and leveraging the best of technology, science, data and partnerships – we were able to make the invisible visible, empowering everyone. This enabled us to find new solutions that can be taken to scale and make a lasting impact.

And that’s what the emerging Fourth Wave of environmentalism is all about.

Source:  EDF Environment Defense Fund

SWIT™ Technology

The SWIT™ technology provides high-quality water in areas that are essential for increasing sweep efficiency and avoiding reservoir souring. By creating a total subsea waterflood system, increasing IOR possibilities beyond what is achievable by traditional topsides water injection systems, the SWIT Technology fills a technology gap.

The Seabox™ unit is our base disinfection and sediment settlement unit. The Seabox unit will encompass three different treatment processes. At the intake, the seawater passes through an electro chlorination grid where sodium hypochlorite is mixed into all of the passing seawater. Inside the Seabox unit, the seawater will be allowed to react with the chlorine for more than one hour. At the same time, particles larger than 15 microns will be settled out. At the outlet from the Seabox unit, a second electrochemical process producing hydroxyl radicals is used for final bacteria kill and to ‘decompose’ biological matters.

The current Seabox standard unit will treat 40 000 bpd of seawater and are operated and controlled by our proprietary control system. Other capacity units can easily be designed using our standard components. The unit has no moving parts and only the Treatment Unit of the Seabox unit needs to be replaced for maintenance at regular intervals. Typically every 4 years.

The SWIT Technology consists of different configurations, where the Seabox unit is the cornerstone for providing a fully disinfected water with the bulk part of particles removed. Combined with microfiltration and membranes, we provide completely particle-free water, sulfate reduced of sulfate free water and low salinity water. Water qualities can be adapted to the reservoir-specific needs.

 

Published with permission from NOV.

Click here to learn how to keep water in its place

 

 

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Turn off the light!

The Crude Life Interview: Bill Wren, The University of Texas at Austin

Bill Wren, The University of Texas at Austin, explains how The University of Texas at Austin’s McDonald Observatory and the collaboration with the Permian Basin Petroleum Association (PBPA) and the Texas Oil and Gas Association (TXOGA) to reduce light shining into the sky from drilling rigs and related activities in West Texas. The excess light has the potential to drown out the light from stars and galaxies and threatens to reduce the effectiveness of the observatory’s research telescopes to study the mysteries of the universe.

Source: The Crude Life Content Network

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Our fresh commitment to low carbon

The world is demanding more energy every day to support growth and prosperity. At the same time, it’s demanding energy with fewer emissions. At BP we’re taking on this dual challenge across all of our business activities. We’re growing our business, providing more energy to the world. And at the same time, we’re reducing emissions in our operations, improving our products and creating low carbon businesses. This is how BP is helping the world transition to a low carbon future. As part of this, we are setting some new and important targets. Head to bp.com/energytransition for details.

Published by BP on Apr 16, 2018

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The SDGs and Business

What role can business play in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) The World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) launched the CEO Guide to the SDGs – a new resource aimed at galvanising engagement from global business leaders in relation to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The CEO Guide to the SDGs sets out clear actions that CEOs can take to begin to align their organisations with the SDGs and plot a course towards unlocking the value they represent. Find out more: http://www.wbcsd.org/Overview/Resourc…

Published by Green TV April 3, 2017

 

Helping gas companies reduce their greenhouse emissions – Q&A

Over the next decade, oil and gas companies have a huge challenge and major responsibility to significantly reduce their carbon footprint and address climate change.

Ernesto Santibanez Borda, a PhD researcher in the Earth Sciences & Engineering Department at Imperial College is looking to help these companies choose the best method for limiting emissions associated with using and transporting natural gas. We interviewed him about his work with Professor Anna Korre.

1. What problem you are trying to solve/address in your PhD?

We recognize that hydrocarbon companies are faced with an enormous task to figure out how to reduce their emissions dramatically in a cost-effective and efficient way while providing energy for increased world consumption. While predictions from the International Energy Agency (IEA) outline gas consumption growth as the fastest among all fossil fuels resulting in a possible gas-carbon demand parity by 2040, there are still significant emissions from natural gas.

My PhD research focuses on the natural gas supply chain including the stages of production, processing, and transport through pipelines or as Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG). It is about developing an intelligent approach to choosing which technologies could be adopted to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) in a cost efficient way.

The idea is to also consider market conditions and policy related uncertainties to help strategic decision-making.

2. That sounds like a big project. So, what steps are involved in your PhD?

My PhD can be divided into three main parts.

First, I will use the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) methodology to understand the full extent of greenhouse gas emissions in the natural gas supply chain. This involves assessing all environmental impacts associated with all the stages of the natural gas supply chain from extraction through to distribution.

I am using models developed by the MERG (Minerals, Energy and Environmental Engineering Research Group) at Imperial College but I will also develop new ways. These models differ from the majority available in the market as there is a greater degree of accuracy in the estimation, most of the emissions are calculated based on material balance principles (which means accounting for material entering and leaving a system), and engineering calculations.

The second part is establishing the costs associated with each technological path using the Life Cycle Costing (LCC) methodology. When companies try to estimate their emissions through LCA, they can often see ways to reduce their emissions by adopting specific technologies. But in order to be able to implement those changes it is important to cost all those options.

The final step is to determine the best combination of technologies and practices that minimise environmental impacts and costs in order to aid industry decision-making. We are doing this  through multi-objective optimisation which is a technique that models a problem mathematically and minimises or maximises mutually excluding objectives. In this case, we want to see how low the emissions can be, if we spend a specific amount of money.

3. Is your PhD part of a larger body of work at Imperial College? Who else are you working with?

Yes, I work within Department of Earth Science and Engineering in the MERG group underthe supervision of Professor Anna Korre and Dr. Zhenggang Nie.

The developed models are currently being tested in different case studies, some of them provided by the Oil and Gas Climate Initiative project in which we are involved in, and the results will be compared with the reported emissions/costs and benchmark values from literature to validate our results. We also want to analyse case studies from the Brazilian natural gas value chain.

I have also been working with the Sustainable Gas Institute, and using a lot of data from Dr Paul Balcombe’s paper (Methane & CO2 emissions from the natural gas supply chain).

4. Why are you concentrating on LNG?

Projections by IEA state that by 2040 inter-regional gas trade can expand by up to more than 40%, and LNG’s share of inter-regional gas trade can increase from 10 to 50%.

In addition, we believe that an optimisation assessment of the environmental impacts and costs of the LNG processes has still not been thoroughly addressed considering the impacts it has on other parts of the natural gas value chain.

5. What motivated you to work in energy research?

Energy is vital to the international economy, but there are still so many challenges; improving efficiency, and reducing our environmental impact as well as meeting increasing global demand.

I found the research around finding ways to meet global demand while making sure we keep to the environmental targets set by the latest international commitments quite fascinating. Seeing companies in the energy sector get involved also encouraged me to join this research area.

Finally, I like the work of integrating different knowledge disciplines such as hydrocarbon processing, operations research, and environmental assessment in order to produce a tool that could be used to make intelligent decisions that have a wide impact.

6. What attracted you or influenced you to becoming an engineer?

At secondary school, I realized I was interested in maths and science, so it was natural to start looking at careers that are related to those subjects, and engineering specifically caught my attention because it is practical and helps model, and find reasonable solutions for daily problems faced by individuals, companies or the society.

The fact that it does not just involve hard calculations, but can also integrate other disciplines into the decision-making also fascinated me because it opened a whole world of options on how to approach a specific problem.


Ernesto Santibanez Borda is a Brazilian and Chilean national. He holds a BSc Engineering from Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, and MSc Petroleum Engineering from Imperial College London.

He also has 2 years of experience as production planning engineer in Escondida mine, operated by BHP Billiton (Chile)

By Zara Qadir

The Sustainable Gas Institute

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