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To Innovate, You Need to Go Places You’ve Never Been

A drone rises into the sky above the Permian Basin in West Texas. The ground operators and engineers monitor its flight path and collect its data transmissions. While this happens, the Drone tells us why it does what it does.

 

Published on https://www.shell.us/energy-and-innovation/shale-gas-and-oil/drone-development-permian-basin.html?cid=social%3Afacebook%3Adrone-unc%3Ajan2019&fbclid=IwAR3j1au345HxkKHM-XCSFUdcDnmhkDasUQ1MOX3sMON7BITGB1hN37pX5XI

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Oil And Gas CEO: New Tech Creates Opportunity

Data from KPMG’s 2018 Oil and Gas CEO Outlook, released Oct. 10, reveals that globally, almost all oil and gas CEOs believe new technology creates opportunities. Eighty-five percent are piloting or have already implemented Artificial Intelligence (AI).

However, only 59 percent feel their organization is an active disruptor in their own sector, and 57 percent feel that the lead times to achieve significant progress on transformation can be overwhelming

“Technology is disrupting the status quo in the oil and gas industry. AI and robotic solutions can help us create models that will predict behavior or outcomes more accurately, like improving rig safety, dispatching crews faster, and identifying systems failures even before they arise. This level of predictability can have a profound impact on our industry, said Regina Mayor, Global Sector Head, Energy, and Natural Resources, KPMG.

When asked about the biggest long-term benefits of AI, 46 percent of CEOs indicate an acceleration of revenue growth, 39 percent indicate increased agility as an organization, and 39 percent point to improved risk management, all within a three-year time frame. Further, they indicate high levels of confidence in their organizations’ digital transformation programs, AI systems, and robotic process automation.

Further, 58 percent of O&G CEOs feel AI and robotics technologies will create more jobs than they eliminate. In fact, 93 percent of CEOs expect an increase in industry-wide headcount over the next three years.

As oil prices remain elevated, industry confidence is up and CEOs are setting their sights on growth opportunities, with 85 percent very confident or confident on industry growth, and 88 percent very confident or confident on company growth prospects.

As part of their growth strategies, 83 percent of O&G CEOs anticipate a moderate to a high appetite for M&A activity over the next three years, largely driven by the need to reduce costs through synergies/economies of scale; a speedy transformation of business models; increased market share and low-interest rates.

“The higher price of oil is playing a significant role in driving a more positive sentiment across the industry,” said Mayor. “Executives are really honing in on ways they can improve internal efficiencies through strategic M&A moves and the use of robotics, AI and other means of digitalization across the industry.”

Despite a rosy outlook, there are still concerns and threats to achieving growth. Among the biggest threats to, 23 percent of CEOs point to emerging/disruptive technology risk, 20 percent say environmental and climate change risks and 18 percent point to a return to territorialism are most concerning.

Publisher by: Laxman PaiWednesday, 10 October 2018 23:36

SOURCE: OFFSHORE ENGINEER

Robo-Glove – Wearable technology that reduces the force needed to operate tools

Researchers at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in collaboration with General Motors (GM) have designed and developed Robo-Glove, a wearable human grasp assist device, to help reduce the grasping force needed by an individual to operate tools for an extended time or when performing tasks having repetitive motion. Robo-Glove has the potential to help workers, such as construction workers, hazardous material workers, or assembly line operators, whose job requires continuous grasping and ungrasping motion. The Robo-Glove also has potential applications in prosthetic devices, rehabilitation aids, and people with impaired or limited arm and hand muscle strength. This NASA Technology is available for your company to license and develop into a commercial product. NASA does not manufacture products for commercial sale.

Benefits

  • Wearable assist technology: a lightweight robotic glove that fits on your hand

  • Small and compact design

  • Human-safe robotics: pressure sensors give a sense of touch or haptic feedback

  • Self-contained glove: actuators, pressure sensors, and synthetic tendons are embedded

  • Ergonomic – the system helps reduce muscle strain from repetitive motion tasks

Applications

  • Construction

  • Hazardous material handling

  • Medical

  • Automotive Repair

  • Manufacturing

  • Repetitive motion work

  • Oil and gas exploration

The Technology

This technology is directed to the field of wearable robotics, where a machine's strength and a human's ability to see, feel, and think are combined to develop a more robust system than if each operates separately.
This technology is directed to the field of wearable robotics, where a machine’s strength and a human’s ability to see, feel, and think are combined to develop a more robust system than if each operates separately.

Originally developed by NASA and GM, the Robo-Glove technology was a spinoff of the Robonaut 2 (R2), the first humanoid robot in space. This wearable device allows the user to tightly grip tools and other items for longer periods of time without experiencing muscle discomfort or strain. An astronaut working in a pressurized suit outside the space station or an assembly operator in a factory might need to use 15 to 20 lbs of force to hold a tool during an operation. Use of the Robo-Glove, however, would potentially reduce the applied force to only 5 to 10 lbs.

The Robo-Glove is a self-contained unit, essentially a robot on your hand, with actuators embedded into the glove that provide grasping support to human fingers. The pressure sensors, similar to the sensors that give R2 its sense of touch, are incorporated into the fingertips of the glove to detect when the user is grasping an object. When the user grasps the object, the synthetic tendons automatically retract, pulling the fingers into a gripping position and holding them there until the sensor is released by releasing the object. The current prototype weighs around two pounds, including control electronics and a small display for programming and diagnostics. A lithium-ion battery, such as one for power tools, is used to power the system and is worn separately on the belt.

Johnson Space Center
2101 NASA Parkway
Houston, TX 77058

281.483.3809
[email protected]

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See How Panasonic’s Rugged Tech Is Making the Energy Industry Safer

Detecting methane gas leaks is serious business—for both worker safety and the energy industry’s bottom line. But manual emissions inspections are time-consuming and costly to execute. To deliver on the promise of a new highly efficient drone-based leak detection system, SeekOps needed a mobile solution that was reliable, versatile, rugged and easy to read in the field.

SeekOps turned to the Panasonic Toughpad FZ-G1 tablet for its streamlined size, extensive battery life, rugged dependability and easy screen readability in bright sunlight. The unparalleled durability and portability of the Toughpad FZ-G1 enables the SeekOps technology platform to bring fast, accurate and cost-effective detection of methane gas leaks to the industry.

“There’s really nothing on the market that could contend with these devices,” said Andrew Aubrey, CEO of SeekOps, “And we knew when we took it out into the field, that we had made the right mobile hardware choice.”

To see Panasonic and SeekOps together in action, watch the video below:

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