While politicians court Google and Uber, fracking industry offers a different sort of high-tech job 0

CANNONSBURG, Pa. — If there is mud on the floor, they say in the shale industry, that means cash is coming in the door. That is, when workers are out in the field and the boots are getting dirty, money is being made.

Thanks to an infusion of high technology driving the natural gas industry, it’s not just about dirty boots anymore – and it’s a good story. It’s a marriage of advanced technologies and dirt-under-your-nails hard work rarely told, because extracting shale is not a popular business politically.

Fracking, it turns out, is the one high-tech industry not embraced by politicians in Pittsburgh who are rushing to embrace the likes of Uber and Google. Why? Because local progressive Democrats, very vocal climate activists, and the burgeoning Democratic Socialists of America party demand a wholesale repudiation of the natural gas industry. Local Democratic officials thus have to oppose fracking or risk losing in a Democratic primary.

Vice President of Engineering and Development of CNX Resources Corporation Andrea Passman stands in a control room that is used for predicting drilling locations at CNX's headquarters on July 30 in Cannonsburg, Pa.

Vice President of Engineering and Development of CNX Resources Corporation Andrea Passman stands in a control room that is used for predicting drilling locations at CNX’s headquarters on July 30 in Cannonsburg, Pa.

(Justin Merriman for the Washington Examiner)

Today’s natural gas industry isn’t the same petroleum job your grandfather or your father would have applied for. It not only attracts computer scientists, software engineers, mathematicians, and geologists to relocate to Western Pennsylvania from around the country, but it also provides careers for locals who thought those good jobs left for good when the coal mines and steel mills closed a generation ago.

Plenty of locals, who perhaps were not cut out for college, just wanted an opportunity to work hard in an industry with a future. All the better if that industry utilized the resources of the land while conserving it — nobody wants to spoil the places for hunting, fishing, climbing, hiking, and camping. Even better, a local job would allow them to live near family.

Mike May is one such guy.

The 33-year-old grew up in Imperial, Pa., along the Lincoln Highway. After graduating from West Allegheny High School, May joined the Marines. When he left the service, he wanted to come back home to Western Pennsylvania and work his way up in the world, but he just didn’t know if he had the career skills.

Mike May, 33, of Oakdale, Pa., works in the control room of CNX Resources Corporation on July 30 at their headquarters in Cannonsburg, Pa. The control room is able to monitor and adjust well sites throughout several states.

Mike May, 33, of Oakdale, Pa., works in the control room of CNX Resources Corporation on July 30 at their headquarters in Cannonsburg, Pa. The control room is able to monitor and adjust well sites throughout several states.

(Justin Merriman for the Washington Examiner)

“So, I started in the gas and oil fields literally working with my hands; I have worked in the industry from the bottom up,” he says as he stands in front of three monitors doing the same thing he did in the field.

No dirt under the nails. No weather dictating field conditions. No mud on the boots. Just precision automation that does the job a team of workers used to do in the field. Now, May does it inside the offices of CNX, a fracking company that broke off of energy giant CONSOL.

“Basically, I was a production operator,” explains May, “I ran all the physical operations, manual chokes, fixing anything that would break or go down; adjusting water dumps to increase the efficiency of the separators, water, and tank levels out there,” he says of the drilling sites.

Now, he does almost all of that remotely.

“See, this is the digital twin of the well site,” he says, pointing to one of several screens he is monitoring in a highly secure floor of the complex. “So, over here, we have all of our physical assets. This is the data surveillance side of the house. We’re also able to control and push parameters out to the field level. So, things I used have to do at the site and make physical changes I can do using technology,” he says.

Twenty miles north of this office, in Pittsburgh, several dozen young climate activists — about May’s age — protested last week in front of the mayor’s office. They pressed Democratic city and county leaders to stop the expansion of fracking in the county and to speak out against the Shell cracker plant under construction in the region.

Twenty miles in the opposite direction, public high schools are offering vocational training for their students that prepare them to walk off the high school football field on graduation day with their diplomas and into jobs that start at $129,000 a year.

Compared to the kids closer to Pittsburgh, these kids from rural high schools won’t have an inside track for jobs at the likes of Google, Uber, and others whom the Democratic mayor celebrates as part of the “new Pittsburgh.”

And the Shell cracker plant the climate activists were protesting? It doesn’t make really make crackers — cracking is the process that converts natural gas products into ethylene and then into plastics. The $6 billion dollar plant began construction last year, with construction employment expected to exceed 6,000 workers over the next ten years and provide 600 permanent positions once the plant is complete.

Since the 1920s, technology and automation have been disrupting the manufacturing world — eliminating jobs and growth opportunities throughout the different regions in the country. Here, technology is creating jobs. For May, automation and high technology didn’t take his job; it enriched it.

“Correct. I kinda evolved with the times. I am truly living the American Dream.”

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SHELL: EXPANDING USE OF DRONES FOR METHANE DETECTION 0

In July 2020, SWEPI LP (Shell) reached an agreement with Avitas, a Baker Hughes venture, to expand the use of drones to enhance its existing methane leak detection and repair (LDAR) program in the Permian Basin.

Combatting methane emissions

At Shell, we place a high priority on combatting methane emissions linked to oil and gas production in the Permian Basin. We have taken actions to effectively reduce our emissions and have announced a target to keep methane emissions intensity for operated oil and gas assets below 0.2% by 2025.

(Shell On-Shore Operating Principles in Action in North America: Methane Fact Sheet)

Working on multiple fronts

We work on multiple fronts to find solutions that enable us to detect methane leaks better, faster, more efficiently and, in the future, potentially with quantification measurements. For example, since 2018, we have piloted the use of drones with methane detection cameras and sensors in the Permian Basin. We have also tested methane detection sensors in our Rocky Mountain House asset in Canada. Meanwhile, we serve as an adviser to The University of Texas Project ASTRA, which plans to establish a proof-of-concept network of methane detection sensors in the Permian Basin.

Enhancing our existing leak detection

Our two-year drone pilot program with Avitas focused on testing the technology and software platforms in a small number of installations and sites in the Permian. We will now deploy drones equipped with an optical gas imaging (OGI) camera and a laser-based detection system across our entire operating area in the Permian and conduct drone-based inspections across more than 500 sites, including approximately 150 sites which fall under the EPA’s Clean Air Act reporting.

More efficient detection and repair

Based on the data collected during the initial pilot program, drone-based cameras and sensors have the potential to enable more efficient detection and reporting of leaks in the Permian. Moreover, in the future, drones deployed in higher altitudes could enable detection over a larger area and an increased number of sites, providing further efficiency gains. This, in turn, will enable much quicker repair of leaks, reducing methane emissions and the related global warming impact.

Published with credit to: https://www.shell.us/media/2020-media-releases/expanding-use-of-drones-for-methane-detection.html

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